Content Marketing and Creation

Every internet marketing strategy will need various inbound marketing types to pull consumers towards its brand. At the heart of this operation is Content Marketing, a value offered to consumers addressing their interests, needs, or desires.

Content marketing is boundless. Nearly 27 million pieces of content are shared every day. Unlike ads you see on the TV or hear on the radio, online content enjoys timelessness—in most cases it’s there forever. This means your hard work will last further and achieve more results for you business than traditional marketing ever could.

Today, 88 percent of B2B organizations are using content marketing. And compared to last year, these organizations will produce 76 percent more content this year.

Content marketing is more like a process than a single step in a strategy. It’s time consuming and demands collaboration from nearly every department or team member. Unfortunately, small businesses don’t always have the resources to dedicate to these tasks and lack experience producing content in general.

Not every small business wants to become a publishing house, but that’s the direction more organizations, both small and large, are taking to make content creation a more central part of their operations.

If you’ve never created content, where’s a good place to start?

Content Marketing: The Basics

The best place to start is with your current consumers, or ideal consumers. What do you know about these consumers? What challenges do they face? What kinds of jobs do they have?

These types of questions help build what’s called a buyer’s persona: a fictional representation of a business’ ideal consumer base. The more detailed you make these personas, the better. They will become a baseline for your content creation needs.

Your audience will determine the objective and type of content you create. Once personas have been established, you can then begin crafting content ideas that address their interests, needs and desires.

Next, determine the objective of that content. Will it generate awareness, provide useful information, explain a complex task, or entertain your audience? Infographics, newsletters, webpages, podcasts, video tutorials, books, and blogs are all examples of different types of content that can be used to package your message.

Editorial calendars help organize when and where to publish content. Content should be unique to each platform its published on, and where the consumer is on the buyer’s journey. Collectively, the content is used for inbound marketing—as a way to attract consumers from various corners of the web.

Using search engine marketing for small business, and non-paid channels, will get your content seen by the people who are in need of it most. The message is the medium, which means knowing best use practices for each individual platform is as crucial as the content your small business creates. Of course, this gets easier over time.

Content Marketing is a process the loops back on itself; when you create content and distribute that content to consumers, you’ll get useful feedback. Feedback is delivered directly from consumers, through social interactions and engagement, and it’s delivered through analytical tools on the backend of the platforms you use to distribute content. This is where the process gets really exciting.

Through carefully analysis, you can interpret the data you receive from consumer feedback and analytics tools to focus your personas, and ultimately drive better content creation.

Content Marketing gets easier and more effective over time, but it requires dedication, and commitment to ensure the best results.

Small Businesses Need Content

Small businesses can help themselves drive more traffic to their websites, create a robust online community, and build loyal relationships with consumers through effective content creation.

In addition to being cheaper than most traditional marketing channels like TV and print, content creation lets small businesses express how unique they are compared to large, established organizations. And that’s a huge advantage.

Consumers are looking for niche products from small businesses. The faceless corporation is less powerful in the communal environment of online communications. Small businesses should take advantage of this by creating content that’s authentic and original, and distribute that content in the places where their consumers frequent most online.

With our help, you can learn how to create content, as well as how to interpret the feedback from your content, so that over time you see the best results for your effort.

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